Which is the right way to pitch?

Hello,

I have a quesion about pitching something into another key.

 

Normally if you have a sample in the key of C major for example and you want it in D# then you would have to pitch/transpose it with +3st to get it in the key of D#

 

But if I do now 2 tracks with a midi scale of C major (from C2 to C3 for example).

In one I pitch/transpose the midi notes with +3st.

In the other one I put the scale tool onto it and set the Base to D# so all midi's will be forced to just play notes in the key of D#.

If I play now both tracks at the same time, I get different results.

 

Which one of them is now "really" in the key of D# and which one is wrong and also why?

 

Thanks a lot for your help :)

2 followers

GAMJoker 10 months ago | 0 comments

4 answers

  • hilker
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    64 votes received
    2 votes

    The one with the +3 Pitch MIDI Effect is now really in D#.

    The default setting of the Scale MIDI Effect doesn't change any incoming notes, so changing the Base control has no effect. Changing the Transpose control to +3 st would have the same effect as the +3 Pitch MIDI Effect.

    If you use the C Major preset of the Scale effect and change the Base to D#, you'll get the notes of D# major, but because your notes start on C, the sixth note of the D# scale, you're actually getting a C minor scale (C minor is the relative minor of D# major).

    10 months ago | 0 comments
  • GAMJoker
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    2 answers
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    1 vote

    Oh ok, thanks a lot ;)

    Is there anywhere an overview of all of the relative scales? Because sometimes I really like the results when I change the scale to a different base note with the midi notes, but it would be good then to know which key I'm in after that, so I can adjust the rest of my mix.

    10 months ago | 0 comments
  • GAMJoker
    contribution
    2 answers
    2 votes received
    1 vote

    Ah, I guess I found now an overview on the right of this site:

    http://www.onchord.co.uk/search.php

    Is this the correct one?

    Could you please just explain me again, why this key turns from Major into Minor just by using a different base note?

     

    Thanks :)

    10 months ago | 0 comments
  • hilker
    contribution
    60 answers
    64 votes received
    1 vote

    Without getting too deep into music theory, every major key has a relative minor key that uses the same seven notes, but has a different tonic, or first note of the scale. For example, the white keys on a piano can be used to play in C major or A minor. These Wikipedia articles would be good places to start reading up on this.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relative_key

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonic_(music)music

    10 months ago | 0 comments

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