Warping Better in other DAWs?

I was very surprised by the following test. I created a 120 bpm drum sample in EZD2 and loaded it into Ableton, Tracktion, Reaper, FL12, and Bitwig.  I then ran it at 80 bpm without any prep or tweaking.  It sounded perfect in Reaper, Tracktion, and FL12, and terrible in Ableton and Bitwig.  Even all of the warp panel adjustments in both Ableton and Bitwig didn't bring them up to the other DAWs.  I am puzzled because warping seems to be so highly regarded in Ableton.  Perhaps I missed something I was supposed to set first?  I was about to buy Ableton for its many other fantastic and innovative capabilities, but this gives me second thoughts.

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frankphx 4 months ago | 0 comments

3 answers

  • cheakypawl
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    1 vote

    Can you post links to these files? With them labelled accordingly?

    3 months ago | 6 comments
  • cheakypawl
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    I've downloaded and warped your 120bpm drum track.
     
    If I warp it to 80bpm in LIVE 9 (complex or complex pro) and REAPER, the results are extremely similar. I suspect both DAWs are using the same stretching technology.
    120bpm to 80bpm is extreme. Slowing down is much harder to do than speed up generally.
     
    Interestingly, the REAPER file has a steep cut off past around 12k, but this is not a bad thing. In effect, REAPER loses the less important part of the spectrum which seems to allow the stretch to improve on the LIVE stretch in the stereo field/phase area. The stereo field is noticeably better with REAPER at the expense, possibly, of some higher fidelity.
     
    I don't know REAPER but just tried the demo. With time, I may try the other DAWs.
    I would love to hear the results from other DAWs you mention if you can google drive those too.
     
    Conclusion so far is that the stretches are very close in quality.
    3 months ago | 1 comment
  • cheakypawl
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    I've tried all of them now.
    They all use the same (to my ears) algorithm. It being zplane. I could be wrong.
    Zplane offer variations of their software and then vendors tweak it to suit.
     
    I've used timestretching since it ever existed for DAWs and TBH the changes over the last 7-8 years have been merely incremental. Most sound similar, but it really depends on the original sound and what you're doing to it. I still consider it a special effect, but with spit and polish and judicious warping you'll get away with using wildly timestretched sounds in a mix mainly because it's everywhere now. People don't know what a real (insert your instrument here) played thing sounds like. That is not a moan, I love it, and all the creativity it brings. But I'm fully aware that fidelity takes a back seat every time you 'change' the original in any way.
     
    LIVE is not foolproof but it's very very fast. I won't go on to describe other DAWs techniques as YMMV, and that's not a bad thing. The question is, what do you want to do?
    In your example, a tough one, taking a drum loop down from 120bpm to 80bpm, is something I would never offer as a solution, but as an effect. I'd rerecord/remake the loop before opting for such a drastic timestretch. Which makes your choice for testing a good one. We're at the limit of what can be successfully stretched there for sure.
     
    "....I'm wondering if you can reproduce what I found using Lite....."
    As I only have your description to go on, unless I can hear what you hear I can't be sure.
     
    Hope that helps...
    :)
    3 months ago | 4 comments

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