I feel like Push 2 is useless for me...

Hey guys, sorry for such offensive title, but I just can't seem to figure this thing out.

I purchased Push 2 like a week ago with not so much a research, (since everybody was just praising this instrument I thought I should just buy it right away)

I tried few different music production using this gear, first 2 days were tough. I had to figure out how to actually operate this guy and addition to that, I am not really comfortable with using live so I had to learn two things at the same time.

Let me just briefly introduce my situation.
I have Maschine, I am a keyboard player, used Logic for a while and switched to Ableton Live about 3 months ago.

Let me explain why I think Push is not for me as a Maschine owner and a keyboard player.
1) Browsing function on Push is pretty good. But I feel like using the mouse to just navigate by looking at the screen is way faster.

2) Sampling Features and converting to Drum Rack is pretty amazing but I think I can pretty much do that on Maschine. I think it would take a little more effort and time. But definitely not worth $799

3) Drum step sequencing pretty amazing but can be done on Maschine as well.

4) As a keyboard player, note scale function on push 2 is just not useful at all. I am way more comfortable on playing keys rather than Push 2

5) Knobs are great but I can do that on my Midi keyboard.

6) One of the biggest reason why I purchased Push 2 was performing live. But with a little more research, It seems like it is smarter to go for Launchpad or APC40 since I will just play the clips I produced.

What is really a strength to this instrument? If I can't really find any strength that can enhance my music production I think I am going to refund this right away...
I feel like this instrument is good for people who don't know how to play keyboard, don't know how to sample with Maschine.

Just simply put,
When I produce music, my eyes are fixed on the monitor even though I have my Push 2 in front of me. Most of the work is done by mouse and keyboard shortcuts and my MIDI keyboard. I force my self to use the Push but it feels like I can just do those with other way easily.

What do you guys think? I am sure that there should be amazing feature on this thing but I just can't seem to find it... 
Do you guys think I just need to spend more time with Push 2?

18 followers

Lignus 1 year ago | 2 comments

11 answers

  • Joshua Boden
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    2 answers
    4 votes received
    3 votes

    You have only been using Live for about three months. You haven't even begun to scratch the surface of what this DAW can do. Its a rabbit hole once you get into working with it regularly. As far as PUSH2 is concerned I love it. The pads feel amazing, its more like an instrument then the first version. Ultimately, I see Ableton as a composing instrument. Push makes that instrument playable. Any instrument you pick up that you are unfamiliar with is going to take time. It comes down to how much time you want to put into it. You get what you give. Then again, you might find that the keyboard and the Maschine work better for your process. Thats cool too.
     

    1 year ago | 0 comments
  • @rickduff
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    2 answers
    4 votes received
    3 votes

    I'll take it off your hands. But seriously when you first played the keyboard did you master it too in 3 months?

    If you treat the push as an instrument and your DAW as well with as much passion and commitment as your chosen instrument your results may surprise even the most jaded artist.

    It's about attitude not equipment. A craftsman never blames her/his tools.

    1 year ago | 3 comments
  • soundsandwords
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    3 votes received
    2 votes

    i've been on the fence about getting push for similar reasons. i too don't quite see the appeal of trading my big monitor and mouse for small screens. i own maschine mk2 and an alesis q49 keyboard midi controller. i don't see the $800 improvement in my workflow with push 2 unless i was going to do away with everything else. but, i've been an ableton user for years and feel pretty confident in my use of the DAW. so i use maschine to accent my process in ableton and to throw down quick grooves in standalone mode.

    i basically made sure that i knew how to do as much as possible with a cheap keyboard midi controller before buying anything else. then, i built up my studio to reflect conveniences i found useful. i tell everyone the same. if you don't think push adds value to your setup, then cool. it sounds like you probably have everything you need.

    all that said, i see what push 2 can do and i love how it's crafted. i find push highly impressive, even if not necessary for me. as others have said, it makes the DAW playable like an instrument unto itself. and the DAW is basically limitless.

    1 year ago | 0 comments
  • Trump2016
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    2 answers
    2 votes received
    1 vote

    I say the same things about Maschine and writing in a second language. They are different things. The Ableton workflow is quirky and not as intuitive as Logic or old step sequencers, but someone learning Ableton first will say the inverse.

    The Push is just a fancy, well built, well priced, midi controller that doubles as an instrument. It's a midi instrument like a keyboard or a vdrum pad. If you are not good with it, then it is not because the tool is bad, you are.

    1 year ago | 1 comment
  • inkblot1
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    5 answers
    8 votes received
    1 vote

    I use a Novation SLMkII keyboard and a M-Audio Trigger Finger Pro. I also have an Arturia SparkLE controller (kinda the same thing as the Trigger Finger Pro) and Ableton Live. I cut my teeth on Acid 3 and Fruity Loops 4, typically with a bunch of Roland and Korg rack synths hooked up via MIDI and 1/4" audio cables, eventually migrating to Ableton Live. So, I've had a decent run with both the software and hardware of recording.

    Here's the low-lown. I've composed and produced a variety of tracks since 2001. Some pretty good (according to others) and some pure garbage (according the other others). What I've learned in the last decade and a half is that some of this hardware you can't live without. And, some, you can pass right on by. The truth of it is usually all about you - but not always. I used to own an Axiom 66 key midi controller. I loved that thing. Only, I could never really get it to sing and dance. The MIDI mapping was beyond me, as I was looking for a more permanent setup (right...good luck with a handful of VST's). The bad news is that I was never able to really get it to do what I wanted it to do. The good news is that I learned a lot about MIDI and such while learning that it was never going to do what I wanted it to do. So, that encouraged me to get the Novation SL - a smarter machine. Since then, most of the midi controllers out now are fairly smart machines.

     

    I"m fairly comfortable with his controller. I can program it and have it permanently mapped to a variety of VST's. So, now, I'm pretty good friends with it. But, it required me to be fairly patient. And, I wasn't for sure in the beginning. I took a chance. Here I a recommendation though - call tech support. Seriously, call them. Ask them questions. Oh, and read the book. And, watch Youtube videos. I learned FL Studio back and forth because I actually bought the FL Studio Bible and read it cover to cover (by the way, it's actually included in the program itself...it's called the HELP file).

    Ultimately, your controller is only as powerful as it's owner. But, keep this in mind. It's you who owns it...not the other way around. Unless, you don't actually pursue researching it. Then, it pretty much owns you.

    Though, in the end, if you've done all that and you still don't see the virtue in it, throw it up on eBay and I'm sure somebody will take it off our hands. We all work differently and require different tools to do said work. In Lethal Weapon, the white guy had an automatic and the black guy had a revolver. In the end, they both do the same thing.

    1 year ago | 0 comments
  • Jamb1020
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    1 vote received
    1 vote

    Well I mean shit if you use Maschine why the hell would Push 2 appeal to you in the first place Maschine studio and push 2 are very similar products in a lot of ways I'm a former logic user so I get you Logic is a very very different workflow and sequencer then Ableton by a mile but you are obviously a trained musician so a new midi controller that is outside of the normal midi keyboard function obviously wouldn't be compatible with your workflow cause you are a musician personally I think Ableton knows its main market and that is  dudes that are not trained musicians that's why it is unconventional and wouldn't appeal to a traditional keyboard player like yourself . Also Maschine is a completely different system with its own functionality that appeals to some people more than others the whole end goal fo this device is to not look at the monitors and say fuck the mouse I mean it's even in the commercial if a mouse and monitor is what you are comfortable with  then you shouldn't have bought it. It's not for everyone I personally hate looking at a computer screen and would rather just jam on something less boring but that's just me plenty of producers don't even own a keyboard and do everything in the software it just depends on your style.  The idea is to have Ableton as the brain and this one unit as your main hardware to interact with it.  It is supposed to eliminate the need for the keyboard, extra knobs , excessive uninspiring monitor gazing , and all of that shit that can bog someone down from being in the mood  if it never bogged you down to begin with then  it clearly was a bad investment . Refund it and move on. 

    10 months ago | 1 comment
  • draconumpb
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    1 answer
    1 vote received
    1 vote

    "I purchased Push 2 like a week ago with not so much a research, (since everybody was just praising this instrument I thought I should just buy it right away)


    I tried few different music production using this gear, first 2 days were tough. I had to figure out how to actually operate this guy and addition to that, I am not really comfortable with using live so I had to learn two things at the same time."

     

    Even the "best" piece of hardware or software is gonna be a mystery to a person who's using it for the first time. I used Windows for many, many years, and grew up with it, for instance. When I switched to Macs in 2007, at first I was angry at my machine. I was frustrated that it didn't work the way I was used to. It felt -wrong-. 10 years later, I swear by Macs and can't stand using Windows, and trying to go back is uncomfortable. Macs are what make sense to me now. I got used to them over time, and came to see their benefits.

    Similarly, when switch from Windows to Mac, I switched from FL Studio (which I had been using for about 7 years at the time) to Ableton Live. I didn't like it at all, at first. It felt complicated and foreign. Things looked and felt different than what I was used to. I no longer felt 'fluent' and everything was a hassle. I was switching from one piece of software to a totally different one, that had different goals and design philosophy. 7 years later, and using Ableton is like breathing. It's very simple and straightforward for me. It took me a year or two to get there, but now I can't imagine going back.

    Switching platforms is not easy, or something you just do on a whim. It's important to research your options, try demos if you can, watch videos, etc. The Push, in my experience, worked exactly like I expected based on the videos and demos I saw online. I had already spent a few years learning Ableton; the Push augmented the workflow I was already fluent with by that point. If I had been a beginner, I wouldn't have purchased it. It's not some magical thing that's gonna teach you Ableton in two days.

    Furthermore, you talk about preferring to use the monitor for lots of things. That's fine, lots of people work that way, but... if you knew that was your preference, why did you think the Push would be useful? You're really just.. not the target market of this, I feel like. It's intended for people who like using Ableton and want something a bit more hands-on than using the mouse and monitor all the time. Like.. I just don't know what magic you thought the Push would perform for you that would convince you to drop maschine/etc.

    8 months ago | 0 comments
  • djmichaelwenz
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    3 answers
    3 votes received
    1 vote

    Try this and see if this helps speed up your workflow... 

     

    Try making your default MIDI track a blank simpler and then you can load samples faster and not loose creativity while trying to learn. I have done this and it makes the push 2 really awesome. 

     

    I did have a bit of a learning curve coming from push 1 to 2 but I am very happy with it....

    8 months ago | 0 comments
  • Absoh
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    1 answer
    1 vote received
    1 vote

    Well your issue here more than anything is that you have Maschine, which is a similar sequencer that does similar things. Not everything, for sure, but your post seems to be complaining about the overlapping functionality of the two: it's like buying a second car, and then complaining that your first car already runs. It's definitely an alternative to Maschine, hence the $100 price difference between the two. It just happens to be optimized specifically for Ableton. 

    8 months ago | 0 comments
  • audioboy137
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    Push is more of a tool for the DJ functionality id ableton, both creating and performing DJ sets.  It's a great addon for Live, but ultimately, you can get similar functionality from other trigger-based gear during performances.  You being a keyboard player, you're probably better off composing with your midi keyboard (hopefully with pads)  and computer mouse.  Push is great for sample editing and automation recording, and drum sequencing - in the end, more in depth midi compositions and mut-itrack recording are better accomplished with regular instruments,  for a more traditional musician like yourself. 

    Ableton is a better daw, just because of the sheer amount of features it contains, and it's uncompressed audio sampling - it usually takes a freshman a little time with in-depth exploration before you can fully exploit it's capabilities.  This coupled with it's live performance aspect - it comes at a comparatively reasonable price, and isn't necessary if you just need a DJ tool, even though the musical possibilities are boundless being most comprehensive with it's logistical capabilities.

     

    9 months ago | 0 comments
  • iamwafelz
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    I'm really glad some one shared there experience with this thing like this I've been making music on Ableton for 3 in half years now and i feel i should share an experience for some one who's been using Ableton for awhile. During Christmas my dad got my the push bundle that came with suite, i was so hype when i pulled it out of the box and i was planning to play it live. Though the more time i used and learned the more i learn that i cant use it. By the i mean the type of music i make which is usually electronic, house, or happy hardcore, cannot be used with this thing. The music is just too fast (most of my bpms range 150 - 180) which is way to fast of a speed for playing live. For the next month it sat on my desk collecting dust while i went right on ahead and started loving suite.

    So about a month pasts and my dad decides he wants to try it out, so i hand him the dust covered push and he takes it out to his friends house who already has it and knows the ups and downs of the entire instrument. About 4 hours pass and he gives it back to me, i asked him "how did it go" of course. He tells me that him and his friend couldn't even work it into my dads music for the same reason (usually 120 bpm for him). My dad also tells me that the only reason his friend uses it is because he makes the same music the guy in the tutorials does.

    So what i'm honestly trying to say from my experience if you don't make hip hop you cant really play this thing live and if you cant play it live, you don't really need it, do you? 

    8 months ago | 0 comments

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