How to monitor my recording properly

I am using a tone port ux1 to record from. When i try to record and monitor vocals or my guitar with the headphones plugged into the ux1 I seem to get some kind of delay or quick echo with it which sounds terrible. I can monitor the sound from gearbox fine if i use that, but then i can't hear my effects from ableton on it. I would like to just bypass gearbox altogether, but I can't figure out this monitoring problem.. If anyone has any advice on how to fix this I would greatly appreciate it. 

5 followers

Avatar_rs 2 years ago | 0 comments

6 answers

  • kpollock
    contribution
    2 answers
    3 votes received
    2 votes

    I had the same thing - It's down to to driver latency as I understand. Even with ASIO drivers and fiddling the settings down in the ASIO driver window I never got it down to unobtrusive levels of delay. I now have a CEntrance MicPort Pro but that's made no real difference to the issue. I just listen on the headphones to the dry signal. I tend to put FX on afterwards anyway. I'd LOVE to solve it though cos I'd like to use Live, well, live!

    2 years ago | 0 comments
  • Mark One
    contribution
    65 answers
    140 votes received
    2 votes

    Primarily it's all down to your soundcard and soundcard/audio drivers. If you want low latency you need a good one with the right (updated) drivers.

    My MOTU 828 (£250) will work at 32 samples = less than 2ms,

    so will my Virus (£1,200)

    and my TC Electronic Desktop Konnekt 6 (£90) will manage 64 samples = less than 4ms

    However once you have a good soundcard the amount of RAM and speed of your computer (processor/buss/drive etc...) becomes important as you cannot run lots of plugins and/or audio channels at low latency before things get messy, especially if you're recording at the same time as well.

    2ms is undetectable to all but the most acute listeners, less than 7ms is essential for live playback of any decency.

    M-A-R-K

    Ableton user for 7 years... and counting : )

    2 years ago | 0 comments
  • Avatar_rs
    contribution
    1 answer
    1 vote received
    1 vote

    well the thing is if i use gearbox to monitor it sounds fine. but if i use ableton it doesn't. I'm using a late 2008 MBP with 8 gigs of ram. i would HOPE that's enough to work properly. I would imagine it's a setting of some kind that i'm just not getting right..

    2 years ago | 0 comments
  • Mark One
    contribution
    65 answers
    140 votes received
    1 vote

    Your Mac is fast enough providing you have enough free HDD space, remember Mac needs a good amount of free HDD to run smoothly (i.e. 1/4 of total). It's all down to your soundcard, how low can you set your audio buffer before it glitches out?

    Open preferences, go to the audio tab, change the buffer size to 32 samples, if that doesn't work try 64 samples, then 128... beyond that you'll really notice the latency.

     

    M-A-R-K

    Ableton user for 7 years... and counting : )

     

    2 years ago | 1 comment
  • kpollock
    contribution
    2 answers
    3 votes received
    1 vote

    Ok I have a PC. 4Gb RAM, i5 2.27 GHz. I am NOT using the sound card I have an external DAC (MusicStreamer II), ASIO drivers and I have never managed less than 11ms latency before glitching occurs. Any ideas what I need to change ? I was thinking about a new machine at some point so be good to know...

    2 years ago | 1 comment
  • kevmove02
    contribution
    1 answer
    1 vote received
    1 vote

    I had the same issue you are referring to here. I was able to resolve it on a Windows 7 laptop, running the latest Line 6 software (did you get all the recent software updates?). This solution only works if you don't have a problem with running Line 6 alongside Live (not the plugin) and have worked through the Live hardware setup lesson.  I hope this helps.

    With most Line 6 audio interfaces, you will get the best performance if you run Pod Farm or Gearbox along side Ableton Live. I have the UX2 and Pod Farm 2.5. I create 2 tracks in Live: one for processed signal, one for dry signal. I then set up Pod farm to send a dry/wet signal to the respective channels. This setup works well with a few DAWs. The only thing you have to watch out for is latency reporting error, which can be corrected by following the process in the lesson on latency error compensation.

     

     

    2 years ago | 0 comments

You need to be logged in, have a Live license, and have a username set in your account to be able to answer questions.

Answers is a new product and we'd like to hear your wishes, problems or ideas.